Liz Copeland on Show #15: Self Care, Walking, Timetabling, Coaching and TED Radio Hour

liz copeland

Self Care, Walking, Timetabling, Coaching and TED Radio Hour with Liz Copeland of lizcopeland.co.uk

What We Recommended:

Tools & Apps

  • Buffer – to schedule social media posting.
  • Using a Timer – “One of the major things I use in my business. I don’t know whether to classify it as a tool or an app, but it’s the timer on my mobile phone. The reason for that is, if I have a job to do and I’m just putting off doing, and I don’t want to start, it I will set the timer for ten minutes, because even I can stand ten minutes of almost anything, other than unrelenting pain, that would fill me. Other than that, I can do ten minutes of something. Quite often with these things are difficult to you just getting started. I would say, right if I just do ten minutes today, that’s all I have to do, but I have to get started on that.

Books

  • Super Coach: 10 Secrets to Transform Anyone’s Life by Michael Neill
  • Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well – “a lot of the problems we have with other people are around miscommunications. It’s when we say, one thing and they interpret that we mean a totally different thing. We think that they are being difficult or they don’t understand us, well they are right, they don’t understand us, but it kind of goes into the various kinds of conversations you can  and the feedback you can give. It’s very useful if you’ve ever been on the receiving end of horrible feedback or, you given feedback and it wasn’t received properly, then, I think that’s an interesting book to read.”

Tips

  • Preparing the Day Before – “A London day, is very much dictated by the meetings I would have there. The day really starts the day before, because I like to make sure, I know what clothes I’m going to be wearing the next day, and I’ve got all the paperwork I need. I hate scrabbling around on the day that I’m doing something, to work out where I’m going or where I’m meeting.”
  • Timetabling – “I will work to a timetable because I’ve got the kind of brain where I easily get side tracked and, I can get … my brain goes one of two ways. Either I can’t start things, because it seems like too big or too difficult to task, so I put off doing them. Or, I get into a task and then I can’t stop it, because I get so involved in it. By timetabling, I know that if I’m going to spend an hour doing social media, or an hour doing web admin or something of that nature, I can timetable it in, set aside the time for it, but it doesn’t take over my whole day.”
  • Planning and Getting Things Done – “I work on what needs to be done by the end of the month, what needs to be done over the next two weeks, because two weeks is a useful time zone, simply because, the stuff that’s in the second week is far enough away, that you’re not scared of it yet. That’s sort of psychologically quite useful. Then what needs to be done this week, and then what needs to be done today.”
  • Walking for Creativity – “What I find happens is that, when I’m on the dog walk, because that’s so relaxing and I’m out in the countryside, it kind of rejuvenates you and it’s a very reflective time, where you can think about what you’ve been doing during the day. Quite often that generates a lot of ideas. At the very least, I want to come home and write all those ideas down, and that gets processed. Also, that’s the time when I’ll think about what I’m doing the next day, and do I need to prepare anything for that. Dog walking is excellent, because you’re out in nature, admiring the landscape. There is something very, I don’t know the word, recuperative, very healing about being out in nature.”
  • Taking Time Out – by blocking off the time, I can say to myself, I’m going to spend the whole of the next hour doing nothing, and not feel guilty about it, because I know when that hour is up, I will be going into work and be working at a hundred percent. Coaching demands energy and focus and you need to build into your timetable space where you can rejuvenate from that.
  • Spas – “I love going to spas and having spa breaks, and being pampered. I just adore the smell of spas. You know when you’re going into a room and you’re going to be massaged and you can smell all of the essential oils, that’s wonderful, I really like that.
  • A Hot Shower – “There’s something therapeutic about being cleansed, about a cleansing aspect of it, and the refreshment of the water. You can walk in feeling tired and dog eared and you come out feeling like a new person and you put your clean clothes on, I think that’s absolutely wonderful. You can tell I’m a woman who’s a cheap date, I like the really simple pleasures in life!”
  • Exercise – “When I’m in London, I’ve decided I will only ever do one leg of a tube journey. If it’s two stops, I will then have to change. I will come up over ground after the two stops and I will walk the rest of the way. I wear flat shoes when I’m in London, so I can walk quickly and that’s part of my exercise programme.”
    Sleep – “I can nap at any time, I’m a great napper.”
  • Dealing with Challenging Stuff – “I think, something somebody said to me years ago, which I think is so true, they said, “Will you even care about this in ten years’ time?” I said, “I won’t even remember this in ten years’ time.” If you’ve got a time perspective on it and you project yourself forward in time, you know, how will I feel about this at the end of the week. You might still be a bit cross at the end of the day, but at the end of the week I’m not going to be. Why not just go into that state now and cut out the middle man?”

Podcasts

  • TED Radio Hour – “I also listen to things like the TED talks. On the radio, they have the TED radio Hour.” Comment from Jo – I also listen to the TED Radio Hour thing, a great way of getting introduced to some of the TED talks to go and listen to the full length versions as well.

To Contact Liz

  • lizcopeland.co.uk – “On there, I have a, you can sign up for change checklist, if you think you’re ready for a change in your life. I also have a thirty-day change plan that you can sign up for. They are both free things that you can collect on the website. Have a look at the articles, there’s quite a bit of information in there.”

Tweet: “I’m on the dog walk and I’m out in the countryside it kind of rejuvenates you and it’s a very reflective time” http://ctt.ec/0QIcw+

Tweet: “I wear flat shoes when I’m in London, so I can walk quickly and that’s part of my exercise programme.” @lizcopelanduk http://ctt.ec/fQk8d+

Tweet: “One of the things I use in my business is the timer on my phone. If I’m putting off a job, I’ll set the timer for 10 mins” http://ctt.ec/RUff5+

Read Full Transcript

Jo Dodds: Today I'm interviewing Liz Copeland from Liz Copeland Coaching. Hi Liz? Great to have you with me.

Liz Copeland: Hi.

Jo Dodds: To start by telling us a little bit about you and what you do and where you do it.

Liz Copeland: I am a coach. I coach directors, partners and senior executives. I'm based in Surrey but I work in London and the south east area. I spend about two days a week in London and the rest of the time I work at home.

Jo Dodds: What does a typical day look like when you're in London?

Liz Copeland: A London day, is very much dictated by the meetings I would have there. It's very much a sort of commuter day. You get up early, put your London togs on, go into London and be wherever I'm meeting people. The day really starts the day before, because I like to make sure, I know what clothes I'm going to be wearing the next day, and I've got all the paperwork I need. I hate scrabbling around on the day that I'm doing something, to work out where I'm going or where I'm meeting.

Jo Dodds: You sound very organised. I was sent to a taxi driver the other day, that I got organised the night before with my paperwork and by bag packed and everything. It put me off completely, because I was sure I'd left something behind, because I normally grab it as I leave the house in the morning. When you ...?

Liz Copeland: I usually forget something, I usually forget it.

Jo Dodds: When you're working from home, do you have a particular, an office or a particular space in the house that you use?

Liz Copeland: I have a room to use as a dedicated office, and it's quite funny because, I have dogs. I mean they're snoring beside me even as we speak. They have chairs in the office where they can recline. I get up and I have breakfast and sort myself out, and I sort the dogs out. They have their breakfast, they have their bathroom break, and then they'll both trot into the office and be on their chairs because, they know that's the routine for the day. It's quite cute really.

Jo Dodds: That's brilliant. I have to lock my cats out of my office, because they just sit on my desk and put me off! That's great. Tell me a bit about the morning routine. Have you got a certain way of sort of setting yourself up for the day?

Liz Copeland: Well I kind of have, it's sort of evolved. Once I get down into my office, the first thing I want to do is go through any urgent emails and process those. Quite often, I will already have looked at those emails, first thing in the morning when I wake up. I check my phone and I run through Twitter and LinkedIn and I run through the emails.

I find that useful to sort of prime my brain, so that when I get into the office, it isn’t a shock for what I have to do, I've already thought about it a little bit. Then the first thing I will do is, go through the routine email stuff, try not to spend too long on that, but it's nice to get certain urgent things out of the way, so you're not thinking about them, when you're trying to do other work.

Jo Dodds: That's really interesting.

Liz Copeland: I would say that ...

Jo Dodds: Can I just interrupt there, it's interesting because a lot of people ...

Liz Copeland: Yeah.

Jo Dodds: Talk about not checking emails in the morning, and I personally do, sounds like very similar reasons to you. Is that something that you've tried and tested over the years?

Liz Copeland: Yeah. I mean I don't have a strength of character to ignore them I'm afraid, a big confession. Dealing with them the very first thing in the morning when I wake up and I look at them, oh there's nothing urgent there, I can just get straight on with my work today, well thinking, "Oh yes, I've got to do or reply to that. Let's get on with that." I just find that something that works for me. I do restrict the time I spend on it, so that I'm not spending a lot of time processing routine emails that don't need to be dealt with immediately.

Jo Dodds: I interrupted you when you were going to talk about how things progress from there. You've done your additional emails, your sort of urgent things, what happens then?

Liz Copeland: Yeah, sometimes I've got a big project going on, like at the moment, I'm writing an article for a journal, that's going to take up huge chunks of the day. If I haven't got that sort of thing on my schedule, I will work to a timetable. You know when you're at school, and you've got your exercise books. At the front of some of the exercise books, there’d be a timetable, where you could fill in what you were doing that week. Well, I kind of have that for my office business, because, I've got the kind of brain, where I easily get side tracked and, I can get ... my brain goes one of two ways. Either I can't start things, because it seems like too big or too difficult to task, so I put off doing them. Or, I get into a task and then I can't stop it, because I get so involved in it.

By timetabling, I know that if I'm going to spend an hour doing social media, or an hour doing web admin or something of that nature, I can timetable it in, set aside the time for it, but it doesn't take over my whole day.

Jo Dodds: Sounds really interesting. What about the end of that hour? That's one of the things I struggle with when I'm sort of time blocking. It's if I get, a bit like you're saying, involved in something and the end of that time comes up, how do you deal with that?

Liz Copeland: I sometimes allow myself an extra half hour, but that means that things later on the timetable will slip a bit but then, there might be some space in those things anyway, so we can do that. I try not to have something take up the whole day, because, what I find happens then, is that all the other things I have to do, I kind of forget about them. Then you go several days and you haven't done certain things, and you really have to keep on top of them.

Jo Dodds: Alongside the sort of schedule, how do you manage your to do list? Do you have a particular app or tool that you use or a particular way of managing that list of things that you need to do?

Liz Copeland: I'm a real pencil and paper person. Well I think sometimes, I print out, this is going to sound so sad, I print out my outdoor calendar for the month and I write on it. How pathetic, I will then put it into the calendar on the computer, but I work better with pencil and paper. I work on what needs to be done by the end of the month, what needs to be done over the next two weeks, because two weeks is a useful time zone, simply because, the stuff that's in the second week is far enough away, that you're not scared of it yet. That's sort of psychologically quite useful. Then what needs to be done this week, and then what needs to be done today.

Obviously, I tend to write things in pencil, because they're changing all the time, that again works for me. I'm revising things and it's an ongoing process. I think I have at long last recognised, that the things I do, the things I put in my schedule, are not etched in tablets of stone. They are changeable and that's okay.

Jo Dodds: It's interesting, the more people I interview on the podcast, the more I have people saying, similar to you, that they use pen and paper for a lot of these stuff, which is really interesting in this sort of age of technology. I was expecting it to be a lot more in the way of computers and apps and so on. I'd say so far, out of about ten interviews, the majority has been very much about pen and paper, which is really interesting.

What about the end of the day? Sounds like quite a structured work day. Do you have a sort of certain cut off for the evening or do you have a routine that sort of takes you into the evening and then into being able to sleep and not be sort of frenetic and checking emails later on and that sort of thing?

Liz Copeland: Right. There's a lot of questions in there. My evening routine is, sounds as if my whole life is dominated by dogs, isn't it, I promise you, but, it's around six o'clock they get fed. Then, they go for a walk, so we all go out for a walk. That will change as we get into winter. I will have to walk them earlier on in the day, so it will be walk and then doggy supper.

Then when I get back from that, I usually have, another say forty, forty five minutes of working. What I find happens is that, when I'm on the dog walk, because that's so relaxing and I'm out in the country side, very lucky where I live, we've got a common at the end of the road. It kind of rejuvenates you and it's a very reflective time, where you can think about what you've been doing during the day. Quite often that generates a lot of ideas. At the very least, I want to come home and write all those ideas down, and that gets processed. Also, that's the time when I'll think about what I'm doing the next day, and do I need to prepare anything for that.

Then at about eight o'clock, we'll start preparing supper. Pretty much after that, I might look at emails, but it's more for social purposes than work purposes. I don't really do work stuff late at night. Other than I do find, that whenever you can truly relax and unwind, that's when the most creative ideas occur. I think you do need to create space in your day, where you're doing nothing in particular, and you need time just to sit and think. If people think that you're sitting there doing nothing, well, that's their problem, because actually, you can be doing a lot of processing, a lot of thoughtfulness, a lot of creative stuff, won't be apparent to the outside world. You've got to create the time in your life to do that.

Jo Dodds: On those days when you're not in the office at home, and you're in London, how do you sort of manage that difference? Because sometimes you can end up, certainly if you have a few days where you're out and about the routine goes, doesn't it? How do you keep on top of what you're doing and make sure that it doesn't in the end go?

Liz Copeland: Well I try to set up things like the social media posting, so that they will happen anyway. I mean, I use Buffer for example, to do social media posts. I have an assistant who will do some of that posting for me. That can happen whether I'm around or not. One thing I do do, when I have a London day, London is very exhausting. I mean on one level it's energising, it's great to be there, I love it as a city, but, the next day I find I'm quite tired, and so I allow extra time in my schedule to do nothing in particular.

If I want to spend an hour sitting and doing nothing, I can do that. Again, by blocking off the time, I can say to myself, I'm going to spend the whole of the next hour doing nothing, and not feel guilty about it, because I know when that hour is up, I will be going into work and be working at a hundred percent.

The thing about coaching as well, is that it's extremely exhausting, because, when you're coaching someone, you're giving them a hundred percent of your attention. Your total focus is on that person. People who have office jobs, they've got no idea what it's like. They spend half the time lolling around the coffee machine and having conversations and, zipping through Facebook in a half-hearted manner and wasting their time doing this and that.

When you're working on your own, and you're really focusing on what you're doing, it takes quite large reserves of energy I think, which we shouldn't underestimate. It's not difficult work, I mean it's not like working at a coal face, but it does demand energy and focus and you need to build into your timetable, space where you can rejuvenate from that.

Jo Dodds: What sort of things you do other than having that, as you say, that sort of sitting time where you haven't got anything scheduled in, how else do you build in that rejuvenating time?

Liz Copeland: Well dog walking is excellent, because you're out in nature, admiring the landscape. There is something very, I don't know the word, recuperative, very healing about being out in nature, at least in this country, because we have a fairly benign climate, nothing too dire is going to happen. That's good. I love going to spas and having spa breaks, and being pampered. I just adore the smell of spas. You know when you're going into a room and you're going to be massage and you can smell all of the essential oils, that's wonderful, I really like that. I also, bizarre though, I've just realised this today, I really love having a hot shower.

Jo Dodds: Mines the hot bath, I know exactly what you mean though.

Liz Copeland: Yeah.

Jo Dodds: Especially in the day.

Liz Copeland: A bath makes me too tired, but having a hot shower. There's something again, there's something therapeutic about being cleansed, about a cleansing aspect of it, and the refreshment of the water. You can walk in feeling tired and dog eared and you come out feeling like a new person and you put your clean clothes on, I think that's absolutely wonderful. You can tell I'm a woman who's a cheap date, I like the really simple pleasures in life.

Jo Dodds: I think the thing about the shower or bath in my case, for me is the fact that sometimes it's in the middle of the day, when, if I was in office ...

Liz Copeland: Yeah.

Jo Dodds: I wouldn't be able to do it.

Liz Copeland: Yeah, exactly, yeah.

Jo Dodds: What about keeping healthy? You've talked a bit about exercise and the fresh air and some other sort of more perhaps mindfulness side of things, what about diet, nutrition and that sort of thing?

Liz Copeland: Diet is an interesting one. My son lives at home, and he has an inflammatory bowel disease, so we have to be really careful about what he eats. The funny thing is, since he got that, we’ve cooked meals together. We've had to give him a much more varied diet, than he had before, and avoid certain foods. I said to him, "I'm prepared to do that, but I don't particularly enjoy cooking. This is something we're going to do together. Here's an onion, you chop it." There's a time I did that, he looked horrified, but he did it and now his damn hand at being an onion chopper. That does give us quite a varied diet, that's very useful.

As far as exercise is concerned, I do go to the gym once a week, and I walk the dogs every day, that's pretty much it really. When I'm in London, I've decided I will only ever do one leg of a tube journey. If it's two stops, I will then have to change, I will come up overground after the two stops and I will walk the rest of the way. Because when you look at the underground map, it looks like things are really far apart when sometimes they're really close together, and work out quicker walking if you go over ground sometimes.

Jo Dodds: Yeah.

Liz Copeland: I wear flat shoes when I'm in London, so I can walk quickly and that's part of my exercise programme.

Jo Dodds: I love that.

Liz Copeland: Sleep, I can nap at any time, I'm a great napper. Not particularly good at sleeping at night and I've always been a bad sleeper at night. I wouldn't say it's work related, I don't sit there worrying about things, I just think, I think a lot. As long as it's sort of, "Oh that's an interesting to think," I don't worry about it. If it were an anxious think, then I think I would get concerned about it.

Jo Dodds: Do you have a sort of routine to, before you go to bed, to try and sort of calm down to be able to sleep?

Liz Copeland: Oh I think I've tried them all. I used to listen to the World Service, which, because if you keep radio 4 on at night, it turns into the World Service at some point, so that's useful. Then, because I've got a phone where I can get iPlayer, you can listen to all sorts of stuff at night. My favourite trick, is to put a forty five minute play on. I rarely get beyond the first ten minutes, I fall asleep. The other thing I do, is listen to audible books. Usually, I only listen to them either last thing at night or when I'm doing the ironing, and it's quite a good way to use ironing time, to get an audio book inside you.

And Audible is funny, it gives you little badges with things. Quite often, I've got the night owl badge because I've listened to something all night. What happened was, I set the book going and then of course I've fallen asleep, but the book keeps churning out, so it happens to be all night. Wouldn't it be wonderful if you could learn stuff subliminally in your sleep, I'd be the most knowledgeable person on the planet.

Jo Dodds: Maybe we do.

Liz Copeland: When I fall asleep.

Jo Dodds: Maybe you are, which we don't know that know yet. Aside from learning through the night with your audible books, what sort of things do you do to learn and improve yourself and develop yourself either professionally or personally?

Liz Copeland: I read a lot of books about coaching, and I also listen to things like the TED talks. On the radio, they have the TED radio hour.

Jo Dodds: Yes.

Liz Copeland: Which is really good, because you've got a whole bundle of speakers in one hour. They'll take a particular topic, say motivation, and they will collect experts from TED talks and put them into that as a presentation. That's very interesting. What I like about that sort of thing, is nowadays, there's a lot of research being done in psychology. A lot of the common sense stuff that your granny told you, is true. Some of it isn't, but it's nice to have solid psychological research that proves that. To whereas I think, previously, psychology has been a slightly woo woo subject and we didn't know if the claims where true or not, but there's some good research that's coming out now. You get such great TED talks.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. It's just amazing that the sort of breadth of information that is there. They have a lot of playlists on YouTube, for TED, don't they, where, for example, I looked at the children's playlist with Little Doddsy and we had a look at some of the ones that were appropriate for children. I also listen to the TED hour thing, that's great as you say, a good way of, in some ways, getting introduced to some of the TED talks to go and listen to the full length versions as well.

Liz Copeland: Yes, I would believe that.

Jo Dodds: What about other things that books, films, music perhaps that you might recommend for inspiration or learning or enjoyment or both? Or all three?

Liz Copeland: Crumbs. I've got a whole bookshelf full of books next to me, and my eyes are glazing over. What shall I tell them?

Jo Dodds: Any particular coaching books? You mentioned you read books about coaching?

Liz Copeland: Yeah. I mean Michael Neill is very good, I've got his Super Coach book that I've just read recently. A lot of the work I do is around communication, and I'm just going to stand up and get a book off the bookshelf. Just bear with me.

Jo Dodds: Yep.

Liz Copeland: I think you might hear a crash in a moment, as a tower of books falls down but anyway. Yeah, so the book I was reading about communication, it's called, 'Thanks for the Feedback' and it's the science and art of receiving feedback well. Subtitled, ‘even when it is off base, unfair, poorly delivered, and frankly, you’re not in the mood” because, a lot of the problems we have with other people, are around miscommunications. It's when we say, one thing and they interpret that we mean a totally different thing. We think that they are being difficult or they don't understand us, well they are right, they don't understand us, but it kind of goes into the various kinds of conversations you can have and the feedback you can give. It's very useful if you've ever been on the receiving end of horrible feedback or, you given feedback and it wasn't received properly, then, I think that's an interesting book to read.

Jo Dodds: Is that thing isn't it about somebody says, "Can I give you some feedback," you know it's not going to be good.

Liz Copeland: Oh yes, you know they're going to criticise you. "Can I just say something?" That's another one isn't it?

Jo Dodds: Yes. Excellent. Good book there to recommend. You talked about using Buffer for example in your social media, are there any other tools or apps that you use regularly within your business that you'd like to share?

Liz Copeland: Well I think one of major things I use in my business. I don't know whether to classify it as a tool or an app, but it's the timer on my mobile phone.

Jo Dodds: Right.

Liz Copeland: The reason for that is, if I have a job to do and I'm just putting off doing, and I don't want to start it, I will set the timer for ten minutes, because even I can stand ten minutes of almost anything, other than unrelenting pain, that would flaw me. Other than that, I can do ten minutes of something.

Jo Dodds: Yep

Liz Copeland: Quite often with these things the difficulty is just getting started. I would say, right if I just do ten minutes today, that's all I have to do, but I have to get started on that. The other way I use a timer is, when I'm doing a task that I know I'm going to get really deeply into and, I may never emerge from it, I will set timer for say, two hours or three hours. At the end of that timer, I will stop and do something else, because apart from anything else, if I sit at the computer and don't move for three hours, you actually would have to un-creak my joints when I start moving around again. There are other things that I have to do with my day, so that works for those sort of tasks.

Jo Dodds: Yes. That's a good one and so simple and there for most people even if they don't have a phone, they can probably find a timer somewhere, in the kitchen.

Liz Copeland: They can use the kitchen timer. They can use an egg timer, there's hour glass things that have sand in them, doesn't really matter what you use.

Jo Dodds: No. We use them with Little Doddsy for her homework, because she procrastinates like anything on her homework, so I tell her she just has to do ten minutes and she can time it on her phone and then stop at the end of that. That seems to work most of the time.

Liz Copeland: Little Doddsy what a moniker.

Jo Dodds: I know. She's almost big Doddsy now, so we’ll have to stop it soon. She said I can go on until the end of the primary schools. We've got a year and a bit but, she's, yes. I do call her Ellie a few times now, she's not so much Little Doddsy. What about if things don't go right, so all the sort of organisation and the apps and the planning and the schedule and everything, what about on a day when it all goes a bit skew whiff, how do you deal with that?

Liz Copeland: Oh well, sometimes I weep and rant and cry. I do have the capability of getting really cross with inanimate objects, which is so… When the filing cabinet draw won't open properly, and you kick it, that sort of thing.

Jo Dodds: Yap.

Liz Copeland: There's one bit of my brain going, "That feels really satisfying," and there's another bit of my brain going, "It is really stupid to get cross with an inanimate object." But that tends to be with stuff, I don’t do that with people. I don't often rant, I do sulk occasionally, so you get all my vices coming out here. Ultimately, I think that, if things are going wrong, sometimes I just need to take time out and have a think about things. When I've done that, I will say to myself, "There's nothing personal in it. The universe isn't against me," because, ninety nine percent of the time, unless you're dealing with a psychopath, there won't be anything personal in it. The universe isn't set against me, it's just stuff happens. Stuff happens that you can't control and other people can't control and things go wrong.

The odd thing is, if things are going wrong and other people are involved, and so good that remaining calm and collected and just getting on with it. I consider, I'd be like a swan looking serene on the surface and paddling furiously underneath, and then I go home and have a rant and rage. Like, "Do you know what they said, do you know what happened?"

Jo Dodds: Yeah.

Liz Copeland: You know, that's life, isn't it?

Jo Dodds: Then I guess it's just setting the reset the next morning and carrying on.

Liz Copeland: Yeah.

Jo Dodds: Yeah.

Liz Copeland: I think, something somebody said to me years ago, which I think is so true, they said, "Will you even care about this in ten years’ time?" I said, "I won't even remember this in ten years’ time." If you've got a time perspective on it and you project yourself forward in time, you know, how will I feel about this at the end of the week. You might still be a bit cross at the end of the day, but at the end of the week I'm not going to be. Why not just go into that state now and cut out the middle man?

Jo Dodds: Yes. That's a really good piece of advice, definitely. On a day, when you end the day knowing that you've had the chance to live more and by that I mean, do the stuff that you want to do, not the stuff that you need to do or you feel you should do, what have you done? What does that day look like?

Liz Copeland: Probably I learnt a bit more about myself, through reflexion and reading and coaching. I mean when you coach other people, you find out a huge amount about yourself as well, so that's an ongoing process, sort of life's journey. The thing that really fires me up, is making connections with other people. If I've had a really in-depth conversation with someone, which of course is why I do coaching, because that's what I really enjoy, the in-depth conversations. The really nice thing about coaching is, I get to ask people questions and they don't mind. I say to my successful business men, "What do you want more of?" And they always say, "More success, more money." I'll say, "Yes, but what do you really want more of?" Because as a coach I can do that.

Jo Dodds: Yes.

Liz Copeland: Of course it's not more success, more money, it's normally, it's either they want something new in their lives. They want to do something different or they want to make a difference in other people's lives around the world. If you want to start something new, or make a difference in the world, that's really exciting and empowering. I love it when I have these conversations with people.

Jo Dodds: Interesting that you sometimes have to sort of push that by asking more questions that people don't come out with that at the beginning, even if that is the heart of what they're doing.

Liz Copeland: They say, what they think they're expected to say.

Jo Dodds: Yes.

Excellent. That's your living more day. Anything else that you would have done that we ...?

Liz Copeland: Having fun and being amused by life, just laughing at things.

Jo Dodds: Does that happen a lot in coaching?

Liz Copeland: You'd be surprised actually. I have a strange capacity. I don't know whether this is going to be a selling point, but, sometimes I make my clients cry, or at least I don't make them cry, but they cry in the coaching session. That's kind of a good thing, because it's a release of emotion, which they need. I don't see that as negative, I just hand them a box of tissues and, kind of let them get on with it, because that's what they need to do at that time. The other thing is, I make them laugh. I make them laugh about things that might have been upsetting them greatly, we turn it into a joke.

My son has a very dry sense of humour, and we have some very funny conversations together, where things get more and more ridiculous.

Jo Dodds: Brilliant. Well, we've come to the end of our interview. It's gone really quickly. I don't think I've said that at the beginning, it tends to fly by. I really appreciate you sharing all the tips and ideas and strategies and particularly your schedule. I remember my school schedule, I really like that. I'm going to have to start doing one of those.

Liz Copeland: I don't always stick to it, but if I'm puzzled about what I should have a priority on, I'll say, "Oh, go back to the timetable and just do whatever it says on there for Tuesday afternoon or whatever."

Jo Dodds: Yes. That's great, thank you. How can people find out more about you, Liz, and connect with you?

Liz Copeland: Go to my website, which is lizcopeland.co.uk, and it's as simple as that. On there, I have a, you can sign up for change checklist, if you think you're ready for a change in your life. I also have a thirty day change plan that you can sign up for. They are both free things that you can collect on the website. Have a look at the articles, there's quite a bit of information in there.

Jo Dodds: Brilliant, thank you so much.

Liz Copeland: Great. Thank you for having me.

About the Author

I work with business owners and leaders to improve their wellbeing, in these days of overwhelm, whether that be physical, mental or digital, using my POWER to Live More 5 Fundamentals of Simplify, Systemise, Share, Self Care and Sustain. I also work with business leaders to help them to improve their organisational employee engagement and wellbeing. I believe they are interlinked in a lovely virtuous circle.

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