Darren Bandoo on Show #17: Blinkist, My Fitness Pal, Trello, Pocket, reading, productivity and learning

darren bandoo

Blinkist, My Fitness Pal, Trello, Pocket, reading, productivity and learning with Darren Bandoo, Personal Performance Coach, Photographer, blogger, volunteer board member for the International Special Events Society and Business Development Executive for PRG XL Video.

What We Recommended:

Tools & Apps

MotionX – “I actually use this app called MotionX. It’s a bit of a sleep app. It’s got this wind down where you will put it on and it will sort of play ocean sounds and you can just lie there. It’s a bit like a head space, mindfulness strategy just to stop or to slow down, and that sort of drifts me off.

Blinkist –  précises of books to read and listen to. “You’re familiar with the app Blinkist as well. I know we’ve talked about that in the past, and sometimes listening to a book where your eyes aren’t active. It’s just you can just close your eyes and just listen to something and let the information settle in, and that sometimes drifts me off as well.”

MyFitnessPal – “That’s something I use more. It gave me a good understanding of what I was eating because you can scan barcodes. I’m quite a healthy guy. I’m not overweight or anything, but I had no idea how or what concept a calorie was. Never counted them ever, and I thought, “Okay. Well, I’m trying to put weight on.” I’m in a body building phase. I’m not going to be Arnold Schwarzenegger, but I had to get a grip of good calories, bad calories, and that’s what led me onto the whole nutrition path as well. It gives you a better idea and fact about what is actually happening here.”

Lightroom – “I use Lightroom now for my photography

Final Cut – “for any editing”

Logic Pro – “for audio”

Trello – “is my to-do list. I’m very visual, so I find I like moving things from left to right once they get done. It’s great for that. It’s great for just sliding things across without too much effort. Trello I use as a task board, but also the ideas board. I’ve got boards for Aroha in terms of client management and things we’ve done which I share with my business partner. Then I have one for Drgnfly360.”

Evernote – “I’m a big fan of Evernote. It’s sort of my brain outside of my head as I’ve heard it referred to once and I refer to it myself. I do all my thinking and capture all my ideas and notes that relate to anything that I’m dealing with in any of my projects. I love the search facility within Evernote and the [filing [00:20:48], so we use that a lot for any content. We draft up contracts, agreements, ideas up, our processes sometimes are even labelled out there. That then gives us a resource because I can share that folder. I’m a premium user so I’ve got a lot more capabilities. Then I share that folder again with my business partner. I even share a folder with my wife which we call our home folder, so all the shopping lists get created in there, and we take snapshots of our bills. It’s a nice one stop shop where you can go search things out and go from there. My top two would be that first one, compartmentalising by having a notebook, then breaking your life into categories that you want to work on, contexts as they’re called. The second is studying. Every time I’m learning something I’ll start a notebook, and for every chapter topic within there I have a note, and the great thing I lucky about Evernote is you can then turn all of those notes into a table of contents at the top. You go into there and it creates these hyperlinks, so you just read through, boom, and then go straight to that notebook. It’s got a lot, a lot of features that I love and use daily.

Jo said “When I am in a meeting I love the fact that I can take notes straight into Evernote which means I never have to write them up again, and I can find them again, and I can even create checklists and to-do lists from them without having to use anything else, and just thinking back a long time since I’ve not used it, but to writing handwritten meeting notes and then looking at them day in, day out in my in-tray while I kept telling myself I needed to type them up but never got round to it. I don’t need to anymore.”

Pocket – “It’s my favourite reader, and the one thing I love about it is that the articles are available offline, so if you send anything to it say from Feedly, you can actually have a good read offline, underground. We’re always underground on a train or anything like that. It’s all there and you can then forward it to any of the other apps that you want for storage like Evernote. That’s one of my favourites that I’m using at the moment.”

Other Resources

MacProVideo – “I have access to a website called macProVideo, and that basically gives you tutorials on every bit of software that’s out there in the world. It’s like Lynda.com. You might have heard of that.”

Music

“I’m a very big fan of Motown, soul, anything all the way up to the high BPMs of the electronic dance music today like jungle and drum and bass, but what I really like is it’s definitely got to be the Motown. I’ve got a record collection. I don’t know. People don’t use those anymore, but I’ve got a vast, a vast record collection sitting right behind me, and I like to pull them out and just dust off anything from Earth, Wind, and Fire. Don’t laugh.

Films

“I love a good movie. I like my horrors. I like edgy things like some of Guy Ritchie’s films or Quentin Tarantino. I like the edgy. [inaudible [00:30:11] with people that take the intros very seriously with the artwork and that really … That’s my creative edge.”

Tips

“I’m a big fan of lemon tea in the mornings to sort of kick start my digestive system before I eat.”

“Getting up that early sort of gives me that time to look at my day, see what I’ve got to do, and then get mentally prepared for it”

“I like to just stick with one topic so that I will make a lot of progress in one evening, whether I’m writing articles for the blog or touching photos up and doing the albums. I like to do a bulk load of work and then I’m happy with where that project is, and I find that I move a lot faster that way rather than spending an hour then shifting topics.”

“As you can imagine task management is crucial here, and I like to organise my days so the middle of the week, so Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday I call project nights, so Monday and Friday is just relax, get into the week and spend some time with my wife in the evenings. Tuesday through to Thursday are project nights, so I pick a day to focus on each of those projects just so that I know I’ve got that time to do that. It keeps me on top of everything.”

“One of my early revelations was I just want to be happy, and it’s not a destination, it’s the journey, so one day I just started thinking about, “Okay. Well … ” I was in a bad place and a bit of a turbulent childhood. I thought, “This is it. I’m just going to be happy.” The next morning, woke up. Made myself the best cup of tea. It just starts from the simple things. You know?”

“Healthy mind, healthy body, and if you’re not making time for health, you’re making time for sickness. Isn’t that right?”

“On the whole sort of nutrition tip I steer away from white rice, white pasta, white breads. I’ve learned a bit more about gluten free and I’m trying to incorporate that in terms of prevention of later degenerative effects.”

“It’s about like having a 360 look at your world, your situation, and quantifying how satisfied you are with various areas, whether it’s health, work, your hobbies, your relationships, et cetera. I actually have a quantified system where it gives you a number at the end of it and then you can work on your lowest satisfaction rating. I urge your readers have a look at it. It’s on my website and any questions I can always answer them. I’m more than happy to do that.”

“To relax. The reading does take me down. I like to surf around on the net a lot in terms of travel. My wife and I we just recently qualified as scuba divers, so I’m constantly on the net trying to find good locations to dive. I’m definitely a warm water fan though. I can’t stand the cold water.”

“Because of obviously the progresses that I’ve made now from my early days of being a milk runner. It was my first ever job was running milk to people’s doors and collecting the tokens. When things don’t go right for me I always just think of the progress that I’ve made, and progress. I remind people if they’re in the same position about the progresses they’ve made, and things could always be worse, Jo. They can always be worse.”

“The trick is how you take it on board, what you learn from it, and how then are you going to turn this into a success. Again, everything is always a work in progress, but without your failures you don’t learn the greatest lessons, and winning isn’t as good if you don’t fail.”

To Contact Darren

“First step if you haven’t, check out my website, Drgnfly360. That’s dragon without the vowels, so just D-R-G-N-F-L-Y 360.com, and interact with me through there. We’ve got a comments page. My email is also Darren@Drgnfly360.com. I’m on Twitter @DBandoo, so say hi.”

Tweet: “The trick is how you take it on board, what you learn from it, and how then you’re going to turn it into a success” http://ctt.ec/2VF84+

Tweet: “I’m a big fan of Evernote. It’s sort of my brain outside of my head” @dbandoo http://ctt.ec/2f5pu+

Tweet: “I’m a big fan of lemon tea in the mornings to sort of kick start my digestive system before I eat.” @dbandoo http://ctt.ec/WPaXt+

Read Full Transcript

Jo Dodds: Today I'm interviewing Darren Bandoo of Drgnfly360.com. Hi, Darren. Thanks for joining me.

Darren Bandoo: Hi, Jo. Thanks for having me onboard.

Jo Dodds: It's great to have you here and find out a bit more about you and what you do. Start by telling us about you, what you do, and where you do it.

Darren Bandoo: I've got quite a few hats actually.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. We could be a while. Couldn't we?

Darren Bandoo: As you mentioned Drgnfly360.com which is all about well-being and helping people to ... It's kind of my personal wellness coaching site where I focus on wellbeing, sharing tips and tricks with people, and also sharing my view of the world as I travel about the place based on behavioural change, productivity, nutrition, and travel really. Other than that I'm at XL Video which is a AV supplier to the events industry where we do big concert AV, LEDs and projection work, so I do a lot of business development for them as well as I'm the Salesforce Administrator.

Jo Dodds: That sounds very technical.

Darren Bandoo: A lot of hats. A lot of words just happened then.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. You have a third arm to this or do you include that in Drgnfly360? Your photography.

Darren Bandoo: There is a element of the travel journalism which is incorporated into Drgnfly360 but we also have a wedding photography arm called Aroha Photography, which is aroha is a New Zealand word for love. Ties in quite nicely.

Jo Dodds: Yes. Yeah. A very busy person, so good to ...

Darren Bandoo: [inaudible 00:01:45].

Jo Dodds: Yeah, so good to have you here. Tell us a bit about your morning routine then. I'm sort of guessing that it will vary quite a bit depending on which part of your business life you're in at the time and where you are as a result of it.

Darren Bandoo: Yeah. You're right. Mostly during the week days when I've started it off right and managed to get to bed at the right times we get up quite early. Sometimes actually at 5am, hit the gym, and then come home. I'm a big fan of lemon tea in the mornings to sort of kick start my digestive system before I eat. Usually I have a nice breakfast shake that washes down the lemon tea and gets me going. Next thing I like to do is have a look at my day and get mentally prepared. Getting up that early sort of gives me that time to look at my day, see what I've got to do, and then get mentally prepared for it. After that if I've got a course that I'm doing or a book on I like to relax before I get head-on into the day.

Jo Dodds: Tell us a bit more about that mental preparation. Do you have a process? Do you have tools and apps that you're using for that? Is it mindfulness, meditation?

Darren Bandoo: It's a mixture of organisation. I'm a big fan of Evernote. It's sort of my brain outside of my head as I've heard it referred to once and I refer to it myself. I do all my thinking and capture all my ideas and notes that relate to anything that I'm dealing with in any of my projects. Trello is my to-do list. I'm very visual, so I find I like moving things from left to right once they get done. It's great for that. It's great for just sliding things across without too much effort. I use a tool on my mobile and my iPad called Pocket Informant which is a calendar app and it brings together to-do lists and calendars and even shared calendars I share with my wife into one place so I can see where we've got our gaps as a family, but also where I've got gaps for all my projects and I can share that with her, so it works quite well for us.

Jo Dodds: Did you say Pocket Info?

Darren Bandoo: Pocket Informant.

Jo Dodds: Informant. Okay.

Darren Bandoo: Like [police 00:04:08] informant. [inaudible 00:04:09].

Jo Dodds: Yeah.

Darren Bandoo: Telling me where to be when I need to do it. It's great.

Jo Dodds: Excellent. So far in fifteen interviews you're the first person who has told me that they get up at 5:00. I'm very impressed. Especially that you get up at 5:00 and go to the gym.

Darren Bandoo: Yeah. I'm not actually superhuman though. It happens sporadically but aim is for about three times a week at least. Again, on the flip side I've got my sort of night time routines and I'm a bit of a night owl. Once I get thinking about a project or solving a problem I could stay up really late and then that does boot the 5am idea in the butt a little bit.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. Interesting. You were talking we, so you're going to the gym with your wife. Fairly new wife if I remember rightly.

Darren Bandoo: That's right. Yes. We got married in May. It was a massive day. She's a teacher, so her time is very precious as well, so we find that in the evening she has no time due to marking and teachers meeting parents, etcetera, etcetera, so the best time to do it and to get it done was 5am. She gets ready and she leaves the house by 7:00, so an hour at the gym and it gives her just enough time to get ready and go.

Jo Dodds: Yes. Excellent.

Darren Bandoo: My encouragement to help her do that was I was going to do it with her.

Jo Dodds: Yes. You see, it's true love. It's the first year. I'm sure it'll go downhill after that.

Darren Bandoo: [inaudible 00:05:40].

Jo Dodds: You talked about your evening routines. How do you sort of finish your day because you've got a corporate role and then you've got your other stuff as well? It's hard when you've got your own business to switch off I think in my experience, and lots of the people that I speak to. You're trying to run two or three things. How do you monitor that at the end of the day?

Darren Bandoo: As you can imagine task management is crucial here, and I like to organise my days so the middle of the week, so Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday I call project nights, so Monday and Friday is just relax, get into the week and spend some time with my wife in the evenings. Tuesday through to Thursday are project nights, so I pick a day to focus on each of those projects just so that I know I've got that time to do that. It keeps me on top of everything.

Jo Dodds: That sounds really interesting. A couple of podcasts I listened to recently was talking about theming days, and my last guest, Nicola Cairncross, was talking about themed days which is something that I try to do, but because I have such a varied series of things that I do, and some weeks I'm at home all week and some weeks I'm not, I find it quite hard on the theming to actually make that work. I guess if it's an evening it's not so difficult because you don't get the stuff shoved at you from work as well, but it is your evening.

Darren Bandoo: Exactly. It is my evening sort of sacrificed a couple of hours there, but I find you know like the Pomodoro practice where you focus for twenty minutes and then have a break. I like to just stick with one topic so that I will make a lot of progress in one evening, whether I'm writing articles for the blog or touching photos up and doing the albums. I like to do a bulk load of work and then I'm happy with where that project is, and I find that I move a lot faster that way rather than spending an hour then shifting topics.

Jo Dodds: What about that sort of wind down time? You said that some days you get that second wind which all us night owls know what you mean. How do you wind down so that you are getting to sleep when you need to?

Darren Bandoo: It is sometimes difficult. I'm not going to lie. All of these practices are kind of works in progress. You know?

Jo Dodds: We all are.

Darren Bandoo: At night sometimes I literally have to switch everything off. Devices. I actually use this app called MotionX. It's a bit of a sleep app. It's got this wind down where you will put it on and it will sort of play ocean sounds and you can just lie there. It's a bit like a head space, mindfulness strategy just to stop or to slow down, and that sort of drifts me off. I've been using that now for the past couple of weeks. I've been using it to monitor sleep for a long time, but I use this particular feature to help wind down. When you've got an overactive brain it's crazy. Everything has to be off first. Sometimes I read. You're familiar with the app Blinkist as well.

Jo Dodds: Yes.

Darren Bandoo: I know we've talked about that in the past, and sometimes listening to a book where your eyes aren't active. It's just you can just close your eyes and just listen to something and let the information settle in, and that sometimes drifts me off as well.

Jo Dodds: Blinkist is where they precis books, don't they? It's all just supposed to take about ten minutes to read or to listen to. I'm not sure I've actually tested out the listening option. Is it a natural voice or is it very computer generated?

Darren Bandoo: No. They actually have people doing it.

Jo Dodds: Not real people?

Darren Bandoo: Real people. Yes. It's not a Siri voice or like on your satnav.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. Because Pocket which I use to manage the articles that I want to read actually does have an audio version but it is very automated so it's a computerized version ...

Darren Bandoo: [crosstalk 00:10:02].

Jo Dodds: ... and I end up reading anyway. I don't listen to it anyway, but that would put me off, but having real people reading it would be good.

Darren Bandoo: Blinkist it reminds me of the narrated books that you used to get when you were a kid. You have someone narrating it and they put emphasis on the right words and the pauses and then add a little bit of tonality to it which is great. It's a real person narrating their bullet points and notes from each chapter and then summarising it at the end. I really do like it. I managed to get through a lot of books key points as well that I've wanted to. It gives you a bit of a preview so you can go back, buy the book, and then have a good read.

Jo Dodds: Yeah, but then the ones where you're not so interested you don't do that, and then it makes it a bit more manageable, doesn't it? Exactly.

Darren Bandoo: Yeah. Exactly. You don't get to the end and go, "That one. I didn't get a lot from that book."

Jo Dodds: Yeah. I'll never get part of my life back. Let's talk a bit more about the sleep monitoring. I was at an event last weekend and somebody talked about sleep monitoring and the guy was saying, "Oh, you know I don't need to do sleep monitoring. I know if I've had a good night's sleep. I know if I've not had a good night's sleep." It was interesting because I also monitor my sleep using Sleep Cycle and part of the reason that I started using it was because it has an alarm that wakes you up when you're in your least deep sleep time.

Darren Bandoo: Yeah. The prime time.

Jo Dodds: Yeah, which is what appealed to me, but I've actually found that the monitoring is quite interesting. Sometimes I'm not entirely sure how it actually works because I sometimes wake up and think I'm sure I didn't have a very good night's sleep, but it seems to think I did. Apparently I had a hundred percent for the first time since Christmas last year last week so it's not bad.

Darren Bandoo: [crosstalk 00:11:46] having a hundred percent.

Jo Dodds: I think the phone had fallen out of the bed. It was probably on the bedside cabinet and I wasn't moving at all.

Darren Bandoo: Yeah. Like the gyroscope not picking anything up. I think that's how it operates a little bit.

Jo Dodds: It's movement, isn't it? Yeah.

Darren Bandoo: Yeah. Usually a gyroscope, and my one does apnoea as well so it listens for snoring and stuff.

Jo Dodds: Of course I don't snore!

Darren Bandoo: I think they're great. I'm a person who, you know I love my sleep which is why I have to take some evasive actions to go to sleep because my brain has to switch off, but once I'm asleep there's literally no waking me up until the morning.

Jo Dodds: It's interesting. Following on from the thing about perhaps you should or shouldn't do it because you know what your sleep was like. I had a night a couple of nights ago where I woke up thinking I'd had the worst night's sleep ever. I thought I was awake nearly all night, but actually when I looked at the Sleep Cycle information I'd actually slept fairly well for the first one or two cycles and it was the rest of the time that I'd been awake. Without that monitoring I would have been thinking to myself I've not had any sleep, and actually I did have some, and we know how powerful our brain is and how we can think ourselves into situations and I do wonder if you wake up thinking you've had a bad night's sleep, it just feels even worse. Whereas if you realise that some of it was quite good it helps.

Darren Bandoo: Yeah. Obviously your perception and you create your own projection of what you want to believe anyway.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. Exactly.

Darren Bandoo: [crosstalk 00:13:21] having that fact to sort of ... Even though it's give or take, but you can look at it and you have a general better picture of actually how you're sleeping. The same with apps like MyFitnessPal for example. That's something I use more. It gave me a good understanding of what I was eating because you can scan barcodes. I'm quite a healthy guy. I'm not overweight or anything, but I had no idea how or what concept a calorie was. Never counted them ever, and I thought, "Okay. Well, I'm trying to put weight on." I'm in a body building phase. I'm not going to be Arnold Schwarzenegger, but I had to get a grip of good calories, bad calories, and that's what led me onto the whole nutrition path as well. It gives you a better idea and fact about what is actually happening here.

Jo Dodds: Let's just continue on that theme. We've talked a bit about sleep. You've just mentioned nutrition. You've talked about exercise anyway. Tell us a bit more about how you keep yourself healthy and the sorts of things that you're thinking about in that area at the moment.

Darren Bandoo: Right. I'm a firm believer in exercise and that helping the activity of your brain. I really [inaudible 00:14:40] chemicals, you know serotonin, endorphins that really A, make you happier as well. One of my early revelations was I just want to be happy, and it's not a destination, it's the journey, so one day I just started thinking about, "Okay. Well ... " I was in a bad place and a bit of a turbulent childhood. I thought, "This is it. I'm just going to be happy." The next morning, woke up. Made myself the best cup of tea. It just starts from the simple things. You know?

Jo Dodds: Yes.

Darren Bandoo: Best cup of tea and decided how I was going to improve my life and got out of my old, you know the early jobs. I was working in a joinery and I had asthma so it was killing me. I started looking at places I wanted to work at, and then things that made me feel good, and exercise was one of them from very early on. Healthy mind, healthy body, and if you're not making time for health, you're making time for sickness. Isn't that right?

Jo Dodds: Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. I interviewed, a bit of name dropping here, the chief medical officer of Bupa yesterday for a different podcast and he was talking about all the work that they're doing around prevention and he was talking about non-communicable disease which I'd not heard the term before, but I haven't looked it up, but I assume it means the ones you can't catch like cancer and diabetes and heart disease and so on. It was just interesting to hear that so much of what you hear out in the sort of traditional route is about trying to cure stuff when it's all gone wrong, but there are people out there thinking about prevention, and that's certainly the sort of stuff that I'm really interested in.

Darren Bandoo: I like [inaudible 00:16:31]. On the whole sort of nutrition tip I steer away from white rice, white pasta, white breads. I've learned a bit more about gluten free and I'm trying to incorporate that in terms of prevention of later degenerative effects.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. What about other ways of looking after yourself and improving yourself? You strike me as somebody who spends a lot of time thinking about learning new things and improvements. How do you do that? How do you make sure that you're continually doing that if you are?

Darren Bandoo: No. You're totally right. You got it right. Definitely somebody who ... I like to learn and with the internet and all the things that we have access to. I'm constantly reading. I'm even revisiting things that I wanted to do in my childhood. I used to want to be a marine biologist when I was younger, when I was going to high school. I told you the childhood, it didn't quite work out going to university or anything like that, so I watch documentaries on the topic, and read anything I can find. I like making videos as well. I didn't know if you knew that about me.

Jo Dodds: Not particularly but that doesn't surprise me with everything else that you do Mister Creative.

Darren Bandoo: I used to work for Apple for three years in the Apple Store and I had a knack for business development but also picking up software and going with it and releasing the creative gene of genius that's in me. I have access to a website called macProVideo, and that basically gives you tutorials on every bit of software that's out there in the world. It's like Lynda.com. You might have heard of that.

Jo Dodds: Yeah.

Darren Bandoo: As a staff member we got that for free, and I use Lightroom now for my photography, Final Cut for any editing, and Logic Pro for audio. I like to [seek 00:18:38]. I've got three words that I use on my website. You have purpose, passion, and curiosity. With those three things once you realise you've got the purpose, you're passionate about it, you will find, you will go out and curiosity will drive you to go out and find out how to do these things.

Jo Dodds: You talked at the beginning about your organization and you talked about things like Trello and so on for getting stuff done. We didn't go into too much detail about what process you use. Do you have a particular process that you could share with us about you've got your day set up and this is how you get everything done? Because you just strike me as you've got so much on your plate. There's got to be some level of organization in there otherwise it wouldn't happen.

Darren Bandoo: No. You're, again, right. Trello I use as a task board, but also the ideas board. I've got boards for Aroha in terms of client management and things we’ve done which I share with my business partner. Then I have one for Drgnfly360. Work I kind of keep in Outlook with all the emails. Sorry, when I say work I mean XL Video and my corporate job because that's where everybody else works and within Salesforce. Thinking about Drgnfly360 and Trello, those are my ideas board and I manage my clients, sort of an overview, through that moving them through steps from leads to accepting quotes, to completing the shoots, and then obviously the job and the albums have gone out.

Again, my business partner he's very creative and very visual as well, so we find that it's a great way to capture all the information and visually we can see exactly where we are at a snapshot.

Jo Dodds: Pun intended or not intended?

Darren Bandoo: [inaudible 00:20:39] it's just great you picked up on that one. The thing about Evernote. I love the search facility within Evernote and the [filing 00:20:48], so we use that a lot for any content. We draft up contracts, agreements, ideas up, our processes sometimes are even labeled out there. That then gives us a resource because I can share that folder. I'm a premium user so I've got a lot more capabilities. Then I share that folder again with my business partner. I even share a folder with my wife which we call our home folder, so all the shopping lists get created in there, and we take snapshots of our bills. It's a nice one stop shop where you can go search things out and go from there.

Jo Dodds: It's interesting. I was listening to a podcast as I keep saying, I listen to lots of podcasts, the other day and they were talking about Evernote and how a lot of people sort of think, "Oh, that sounds like it's something that might be useful to me." They set up an account and then they don't do anything further because they don't really know how to use it. Their suggestion was that you come up with a top ten list of notebooks to set up or notes to have in there for newbies that would start to highlight the potential uses, and as you said scanning bills, having a shared folder for home, and things like shopping lists, and so on is probably a good start for lots of people. I scan business cards into Evernote now.

Darren Bandoo: The [app is 00:22:11] brilliant.

Jo Dodds: Yeah, because it's quite handy to do that, and actually it can automatically add those to contacts in Google, so I've set it up to do that which puts a level of automation in there which was handy. I'm looking at Evernote as I'm talking to you because my questions are on here.

Darren Bandoo: Yeah. My answer are in here too!

Jo Dodds: It's interesting if you can actually start to articulate some of the examples of how it gets used to people. All my recipes are in Evernote for example and we have an iPad in the kitchen and all our recipes go there, and in fact I've got recipe books now that I'm working my way through and photographing that page and putting it into Evernote because it's much more convenient there and you've got it in the shop if you want to buy the ingredients and so on, or if you're at somebody's house and you want to cook something, it's not in my cupboard back at home. It's actually on your phone or on your iPad or something.

Darren Bandoo: [inaudible 00:23:08] going to get caught on the spot without your device.

Jo Dodds: Exactly.

Darren Bandoo: One of the really amazing things I like about Evernote. I use it for one of the articles I've written recently is all about I've got six steps to getting back on track, and it's all about compartmentalising.

Jo Dodds: Right.

Darren Bandoo: It's about like having a 360 look at your world, your situation, and quantifying how satisfied you are with various areas, whether it's health, work, your hobbies, your relationships, et cetera. I actually have a quantified system where it gives you a number at the end of it and then you can work on your lowest satisfaction rating. I urge your readers have a look at it. It's on my website and any questions I can always answer them. I'm more than happy to do that.

Jo Dodds: That sounds great.

Darren Bandoo: Another way ...

Jo Dodds: You know you just said readers then, didn't you? You know we are being listened to, don't you?

Darren Bandoo: They’ll be reading when the transcript goes out. Because actually this is my first podcast interview so [inaudible 00:24:15].

Jo Dodds: Very good. Very proactive on the transcript as you say. Sorry. I interrupted you. Carry on.

Darren Bandoo: I was only actually going to go lead onto studying. You mentioned students and people wanting to know sort of the top ten. My top two would be that first one, compartmentalising by having a notebook, then breaking your life into categories that you want to work on, contexts as they're called. The second is studying. Every time I'm learning something I'll start a notebook, and for every chapter topic within there I have a note, and the great thing I lucky about Evernote is you can then turn all of those notes into a table of contents at the top. You go into there and it creates these hyperlinks, so you just read through, boom, and then go straight to that notebook. It's got a lot, a lot of features that I love and use daily.

Jo Dodds: It's interesting as well because if you think about if you said to somebody, "Here, have a folder with some dividers. Go and use it to do whatever." People probably would quite happily do that and understand it, but then it goes into technology and the sort of techie bit gets in the way, but as you say it's about having pages which are called notes, and notebooks which are like a notebook, and that's all it is, and then the tags, as you say, which make it really, really searchable, so for me I love going to meetings. No. I don't love going to ... Did I just say ... That's a soundbite, isn't it? I love going to meetings. I don't love going to meetings.

When I am in a meeting I love the fact that I can take notes straight into Evernote which means I never have to write them up again, and I can find them again, and I can even create checklists and to-do lists from them without having to use anything else, and just thinking back a long time since I've not used it, but to writing handwritten meeting notes and then looking at them day in, day out in my in-tray while I kept telling myself I needed to type them up but never got round to it. I don't need to anymore.

Darren Bandoo: No, but it's [just a lot 00:26:25] ... They're very time saving.

Jo Dodds: Yeah.

Darren Bandoo: I've tied that note taking practice for studying in with ... You've obviously heard of Tim Ferris and the Four Hour Week?

Jo Dodds: Yeah.

Darren Bandoo: I'm sure a lot of your readers will have heard of him as well. He's got this article that he wrote about sort of taking notes I think like a demon or like a madman, like a genius. If you take some of the practices from there into Evernote it ties in really well, and I know he's a big advocate, and I think he's a backer of Evernote as well. He takes his organisation and human experiments very seriously.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. Exactly. He does, doesn't he? Any other tools or apps that you want to recommend. We've gone into some detail on a few of them.

Darren Bandoo: I know it's one of your personal favourites as well, Pocket.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. Love it.

Darren Bandoo: It's my favourite reader, and the one thing I love about it is that the articles are available offline, so if you send anything to it say from feedly, you can actually have a good read offline, underground. We're always underground on a train or anything like that. It's all there and you can then forward it to any of the other apps that you want for storage like Evernote. That's one of my favourites that I'm using at the moment.

Jo Dodds: Me too. I love the search facility on it. I did a webinar a little while ago, and we were talking about millennials and I just typed millennials into my Pocket account and it pulled all the articles that I'd saved and read or not read on the topic, and I was able to flick through and come up with a few quotes and sounded like I was really on it and knowledgeable when really I was just using Pocket. I notice they've come up with a beta test version of the next iteration of it today. I got an email earlier which I've not had a chance to look at, so it will be interesting to see what else it will be able to do. Brilliant. What about other recommendations for, I mean obviously if you've got more tools or apps or things like books, and music, and films. You sound like, again, you're probably into all three of those.

Darren Bandoo: I am. A lot of my relax time is around reading. I used to DJ a lot as well back in my youth. I have a vast music ... I'm a very big fan of Motown, soul, anything all the way up to the high BPMs of the electronic dance music today like jungle and drum and bass, but what I really like is it's definitely got to be the Motown. I've got a record collection. I don't know. People don't use those anymore, but I've got a vast, a vast record collection sitting right behind me, and I like to pull them out and just dust off anything from Earth, Wind, and Fire. Don't laugh.

Jo Dodds: No. No. It sounds good.

Darren Bandoo: [inaudible 00:29:20] Miles Davis and right through. A bit of the Jacksons, why not, in there.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. Exactly.

Darren Bandoo: A bit of [inaudible 00:29:27]. Gladys Night and the Pips. All of those funky, really funky tunes. I've got an affinity with the funk.

Jo Dodds: That might have to be my soundbite for the beginning of the show.

Darren Bandoo: Affinity for the funk.

Jo Dodds: What about films? You said you do your own videos and you're involved in the creative industry. Are you a film fan?

Darren Bandoo: Yeah. I love a good movie. I like my horrors. I like edgy things like some of Guy Ritchie's films or Quentin Tarantino. I like the edgy. [inaudible 00:30:11] with people that take the intros very seriously with the artwork and that really ... That's my creative edge. Things like [Machete 00:30:21].

Jo Dodds: Right. Yeah.

Darren Bandoo: Funny like B grade movies or the spaghetti westerns are a bit of a laugh for me. I do enjoy those just to relax and wind down.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. Cool. What about relaxation? You said you're very busy. You've mentioned relaxing with reading and films and obviously you do sports, so I guess that's part of it too. Anything else that you throw in to make sure apart from your lemon tea? That's probably not relaxing. That's to get you going, isn't it?

Darren Bandoo: Yeah. To relax. The reading does take me down. I like to surf around on the net a lot in terms of travel. My wife and I we just recently qualified as scuba divers, so I'm constantly on the net trying to find good locations to dive. I'm definitely a warm water fan though. I can't stand the cold water.

Jo Dodds: No. No. I wouldn't like that either. In fact I wouldn't even like the going underneath the water thing, so I wouldn't even do the diving bit, but that sounds great. What about if things don't go right? What happens on those days? How do you deal with that?

Darren Bandoo: After throwing my toys you mean?

Jo Dodds: Yeah. We've picked them all up, put them back in your pram. What do you do then?

Darren Bandoo: Because of obviously the progresses that I've made now from my early days of being a milk runner. It was my first ever job was running milk to people's doors and collecting the tokens. When things don't go right for me I always just think of the progress that I've made, and progress. I remind people if they're in the same position about the progresses they've made, and things could always be worse, Jo. They can always be worse.

Jo Dodds: Yes. That is true. That's definitely.

Darren Bandoo: The trick is how you take it on board, what you learn from it, and how then are you going to turn this into a success. Again, everything is always a work in progress, but without your failures you don't learn the greatest lessons, and winning isn't as good if you don't fail.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. No. That's true.

Darren Bandoo: I always tell myself that it could always be worse.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. On a day when you end the day knowing that you've had that time to live more, and by that I mean do the stuff that you really want to do rather than the stuff you need to do or you should do, or you have to do, or what everyone else is telling you to do, what have you done? What's that day look like?

Darren Bandoo: You've just asked me what would my perfect day pretty much be like.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. It's a very long winded way of asking you that question.

Darren Bandoo: My perfect day ...

Jo Dodds: My website title doesn't include perfect day. It includes live more, so come on. Indulge me.

Darren Bandoo: [inaudible 00:33:10] perfect day. Okay. The day where I feel like I've had the power to live more would definitely be ...

Jo Dodds: Very good. You can come again.

Darren Bandoo: It would definitely be a day where ... I do like to get up early. If I can catch a sunrise and take photos of it that would be a great way to start, whether I go to the gym or not. A bit of photography, spending time with family, loved ones. Getting some projects. I like helping people. Helping people is one of the drive and the purpose behind Drgnfly360. Helping people to succeed, so if I can do a bit of that and help even if someone tells me that, "Darren, thank you very much. That helps a lot." Even if it's just a little thing that ends the day. That fills the day with a lot of satisfaction for me, and not so much just for myself. Wrapping up in the evening I'm known for having a bit of a whisky in the evening with my lady, chilling out, and just watching a movie. That would end it really nice.

The day time is filled with helping people and photography. That's what I really like to do a lot of and a lot more of. It's what I want to do. If anybody wants to talk photography or personal development I'm right here.

Jo Dodds: Brilliant. That's a nice lead in to how people can find out more about you and connect with you.

Darren Bandoo: Great. First step if you haven't, check out my website, Drgnfly360. That's dragon without the vowels, so just D-R-G-N-F-L-Y 360.com, and interact with me through there. We've got a comments page. My email is also Darren@Drgnfly360.com. I'm on Twitter @DBandoo, so say hi.

Jo Dodds: Brilliant. Thank you so much for joining me. I've really enjoyed the conversation. We've had a similar conversation in person only a few weeks ago, haven't we? Swapping notes and sharing ideas and tasks, tasks? Tools and apps and things like that, so it's been great to get you on the show so that you could share that with our listeners.

Darren Bandoo: We were have a bit of a geek out.

Jo Dodds: Yeah. Exactly. Exactly. That was brilliant. Thank you so much.

Darren Bandoo: No worries. Thanks again for having me. I look forward to chatting with you as always.

About the Author

I work with business owners and leaders to improve their wellbeing, in these days of overwhelm, whether that be physical, mental or digital, using my POWER to Live More 5 Fundamentals of Simplify, Systemise, Share, Self Care and Sustain. I also work with business leaders to help them to improve their organisational employee engagement and wellbeing. I believe they are interlinked in a lovely virtuous circle.

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